Consulado General de la República Argentina en Chicago Estados Unidos de América

A hundred years: Cortázar, before and after by Pablo Brescia (Lecture)

Cervantes Institute – 31 W. Ohio St, Chicago IL

November 5th, 2014 – 6:00pm

 

Like any other canonical writer, 30 years after the death and 100 years after the birth of Argentine writer Julio Cortázar, we find behind the official celebrations many uncovered stories that shed light on his life and work. This presentation will focus, on the one hand, on the period between 1937 and 1951, when Cortázar absorbs many readings and begins to write, later becoming one of the "Boom" writers, and, on the other hand, on how some contemporary writers read him today. In this way, we will begin to reveal these aforementioned stories and see how they allow us to both project a new, or perhaps different, Cortázar both into the past and into the future.

Free and open to the public. Space is limited. RSVP http://pbrescia.bpt.me

Dr. Pablo Brescia is Professor of Latin American literature at the University of South Florida, where he teaches courses on 20th and 21st century Latin American literature, culture and film. His areas of research are Latin American short fiction history and theory, Hispanic cinema and literature, philosophy and literature and technology and literature. He is the author of Modelos y prácticas en el cuento hispanoamericano: Arreola, Borges, Cortázar ( 2011), and the editor of five other academic books. He has published more than sixty articles, essays, book and film reviews, interviews and translations in books and journals from Argentina, Canada, Colombia, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Mexico, Norway, Puerto Rico, Spain, the United States and Uruguay

 

Organizers

Instituto Cervantes (Chicago)

 

Collaborating Organizations

Consulate General of Argentina in Chicago

 

For further information, please visit: http://chicago.cervantes.es/en/culture_spanish/culture_spanish.htm



 

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